December 6, 2010

TechCrunch Review: Google Nexus S

For the last few days we’ve been using the Google Nexus S, manufactured by Samsung, with the new Android 2.3 “Gingerbread” operating system. This is a phone that was designed with direct input from the Google Android team. And like its predecessor, the Nexus One, which was released in January 2010, it has a “clean” install of Android. That means there is no additional software layer from third party OEMs or carriers to interfere with the user experience. Like the Nexus One, this will become the reference phone for this generation of Android.

Unlike the Nexus One, the phone was not built from scratch – the starting point was the Samsung Galaxy S, released earlier this year. And Google will not be selling this phone directly to consumers. They say that experiment is over, and this phone will be available initially at Best Buy in the U.S. (on T-Mobile) and Carphone Warehouse in the U.K. Google says the phone is currently expected to be available starting December 16, although pre-orders might be taken earlier.

The phone does not fail to please. It is significantly faster than the Nexus One (and most current generation phones), has a high-end AMOLED 400 x 800 resolution screen that is second only to the iPhone 4, and is NFC-enabled. Like all Android phones it is dead simple to set up, assuming you use Gmail, Google Calendar, Google contacts, etc. But it’s Google’s various apps, some of which are unavailable for the iPhone, that make it the best phone on the market today.

The phone has a sleeker design than the Nexus One, although its generic black plastic case doesn’t exactly scream for attention. The case also feels somewhat cheap, unlike the solid feel of the iPhone and some previous Android phones. But it is very thin and light – just 4.55 ounces (slightly heavier than the Galaxy S). The phone’s dimensions are 63mm x 123.9mm x 10.88mm (slightly thicker, taller and wider than the iPhone 4, and with a larger screen). It is significantly svelter than the EVO or the Droid X, previous generation Android phones that we thought were too bulky.

Hardware:

The Nexus S uses the 1 GHz Hummingbird processor, which absolutely zooms and also seems to handle running multiple apps and background processes well compared to previous Android devices we’ve used. The 4 inch Super AMOLED 480×800 touchscreen has very deep blacks and viewing angles and is, as we said above, second only to the slightly smaller but higher resolution iPhone 4 display.

Battery life is good – much, much better than the dismal HTC EVO. We’ve been getting 6+ hours of heavy voice/data usage on the removable 1500 mAh Lithium Ion battery. Google’s official specs are up to 400 minutes of talk time on 3G, 841 minutes on 2G, and standby time of 428/714 hours on 3G/2G. That may be somewhat enthusiastic, but battery life is certainly not a big problem compared to other devices we’ve used this year.

The phone has both a rear facing 5 megapixel camera, with a flash, as well as a VGA front facing camera. Both performed well. The phone also has a gyroscope, accelerometer, compass, proximity sensor, haptic feedback and a light sensor. It comes with 16 GB of internal flash memory; there is no expansion slot.

Wifi, GPS and bluetooth all behaved flawlessly.

And, as Google CEO Eric Schmidt hinted at during Web 2.0 Summit, the Nexus S has Near Field Communication (NFC) built in — a new feature that Gingerbread adds support for. At this point you probably won’t have many reasons to have it activated (you can shut it off to preserve battery), but NFC is likely to prove very important over the next couple years. Eventually, the technology will allow you to use your phone in place of a credit card by simply tapping the phone against special sensors in retail stores. NFC will also allow for phones to swap data between each other with a minimal amount of hassle, as soon as developers add support for that (the Nexus S chip supports both read and write operations). This is basically future-proofing the phone, and a year from now I expect that most Android phones (and likely iPhones) will be shipping with NFC.

Google’s noise cancellation software is also present. When combined with the excellent audio hardware it results in very high quality calls. In test calls from my car the recipient said they heard very little background noise – the iPhone in particular performed terribly in a similar test.

So far, not one dropped call.



Software:

We’ve been a big proponent of using Android phones along with Google Voice and other Google apps. It makes setup of a new phone very easy – a minute or two at most – and we both continue to use our existing Google Voice phone numbers for inbound and outbound phones. The Nexus S comes with the Google Voice app pre-installed, saving additional minutes.


But the main event is Gingerbread operating system, which comes installed on the phone. No, the UI hasn’t seen a ground-up redesign (that’s coming in Honeycomb), but it’s improved in a lot of small ways, like the switch from a drab gray to a black notification bar (which actually helps save battery).

It comes with old crowd-pleasers like the on-the-fly creation of Wi-Fi hotspots. And Google has also iterated on the user interface, particularly the keyboard. It’s not as polished as the iPhone, but text entry is significantly faster than previous Android phones, with less errors. It is also much better at predicting words, and copy-and-paste has been improved as well. If the iPhone is 8/10 on text input, the Nexus One is probably 5/10 and the Nexus S is a solid 6/10.

Gingerbread also supports VoIP/SIP calling.

Best of all, of course, is the fact that the Nexus S is a clean install of Android, and a pure Google experience. There is no messy third-party software to muck things up.

The Nexus S Experience:

We can write all day about a phone, but the real test with us is whether we continue to use it after a post. The EVO and the Droid X were quickly forgotten for us. Michael tested the iPhone 4 but its lack of point to point navigation and unwillingness to play well with Google Voice made him ultimately give it up after a month and move back to the Nexus One (Google Voice has finally made it to the iPhone, but it isn’t as deeply integrated into the OS as on Android, and probably never will be). The Nexus S will almost certainly be his go-to phone for the next few months. Michael is leaving today for a week in Europe, and taking only this phone with him. The fact that it’s unlocked means he can add a sim card once he is in Paris and continue to use it without extravagant additional charges.

Google’s voice search/input applications and Google Navigation continue to make Android phones in general significantly better mobile devices than the iPhone. Conversely, Google continues to flail on media, and the device is not any better than previous Android phones at dealing with stored music. That’s why Michael will also be bringing an iPad to Europe, which integrates perfectly with iTunes.

The bottom line is this. If you are an iPhone user this isn’t going to make you switch. If you’re an Android user you will want this phone more than any other. If you’re currently neither, we recommend that you go with the Nexus S. It is better than the iPhone in most ways. What you lose with the slightly less impressive screen and iOS’s slightly slicker user experience you will more than make up for with the Nexus S’s ability to actually make phone calls that don’t drop and Google’s exceptional Navigation and voice input applications. The fact that the phone is unlocked and can be used abroad with other carriers is also a very big plus.(techcrunch.com)


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September 17, 2010

Canon G12 playing finally released

Complete with HD video rumor turned out to exist in such a small camera

Canon G12 looks no different with the Canon G11. Has the same sensor size, but updated with video features 720p and High Sensitivity mode.
Canon G12 will sell $ 500 in October 2010.
















The Canon PowerShot G12 has a large, bright 2.8-inch vari-angle LCD with 461,000 dots of resolution providing photographers with additional creative control whether holding the camera overhead or low to the ground. A new control dial has been added to the front of the camera as well for easy adjusting of camera settings similar to how users operate a Canon Digital SLR camera. Further adding to the overall appeal of the new Canon PowerShot G12 is a 5X-Optical Zoom lens with Optical Image Stabilization and its wide-angle capabilities starting at 28mm, which will help when trying to get a sweeping landscape into one image. When using compatible optional accessories such as Speedlite flashes, an underwater housing and a tele-converter lens the photographic possibilities for users of this new camera are almost endless.

The estimated selling price of the PowerShot G12 is $499.99 and will be available in early October.*

For comparison the Canon G12 with other camera models today

Canon PowerShot G11 Canon PowerShot G12 Canon PowerShot S95 Nikon Coolpix P7000 Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5
Sensor (effective resolution) 10-megapixel CCD 10-megapixel CCD 10-megapixel CCD 10-megapixel CCD 10-megapixel CCD
1/1.7-inch 1/1.7-inch 1/1.7-inch 1/1.7-inch 1/1.63-inch
Sensitivity range ISO 80 - ISO 3200 ISO 80 - ISO 3200 ISO 80 - ISO 3200 ISO 100 - ISO 3200/6400 (expanded) ISO 80 - ISO 3200
Lens 28-140mm
f2.8-4.5
5x
28-140mm
f2.8-4.5
5x
28-105mm f2-4.9
3.8x
28-200mm
f2.8-5.6
7.1x
24-90mm
f2-3.3
3.8x
Closest focus (inches) 0.4 0.4 2.0 0.8 0.4
Continuous shooting 1.1fps
frames n/a
1.1fps
frames n/a
0.7
frames n/a
1.1fps
n/a
2.5 fps
JPEG/n/a raw
Viewfinder Optical Optical None Optical Optional OVF or EVF
Autofocus n/a
Contrast AF
n/a
Contrast AF
n/a
Contrast AF
99-area
Contrast AF
23-area
Contrast AF
Metering n/a n/a n/a 256-segment matrix n/a
Shutter 15-1/4000 sec 15-1/4000 sec 15-1/1600 sec 60-1/4000 sec 60-1/4000 sec
Flash Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Hot shoe Yes Yes No Yes Yes
LCD 2.8-inch articulated
461,000 dots
2.8-inch articulated
461,000 dots
3-inch fixed
461,000 dots
3-inch fixed
921,000 dots
3-inch fixed
460,000 dots
Image stabilization Optical Optical Optical Optical Optical
Video (best quality) 30fps VGA H.264 QuickTime MOV
Monaural
720/24p
H.264 QuickTime MOV
Stereo
720/24p
H.264 QuickTime MOV
Stereo
720/24p H.264 QuickTime MOV
Stereo
720/30p AVCHD Lite
Monaural
Manual iris and shutter in video No No No n/a Yes
Optical zoom while recording No No Yes Yes n/a
Mic input No No No Yes No
Battery life (CIPA rating) 390 shots 390 shots 220 shots 350 shots 400 shots
Dimensions (WHD, inches) 4.4 x 3.0 x 2.0 4.4 x 3.0 x 2.0 3.9 x 2.3 x 1.2 4.1 x 2.4 x 1.2 4.3 x 2.6 x 1.7
Weight (ounces) 14.5 14.5 (est) 7 (est) 8.5 (est) 9.8 (est)
Mfr. Price $499.99 $499.99 $399.99 $499.95 $440
Availability October 2009 October 2010 August 2010 September 2010 August 2010
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September 3, 2010

super-thin speaker

thin super-thin speakers that are thinner than the ultra slim flat tv that we've seen on the wall?

FleXspeaker developed by a Taiwanese company, Itri has shown that very thin speaker products. So that we may not be aware of the existence of this speaker if mounted on a wall or elsewhere. FleXspeaker not only slim but also flexible so it can take the form of curved surfaces will be fitted with this slim speaker. Flexspeaker also consumes very little power, very sempurnya it for other portable applications? = P
Unfortunately, FleXspeaker can only spend up to 20 kHz output at the moment.

3BJ53HU282CT
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July 18, 2010

Where You Can Buy Servo Valves

The servo valves are used for different things to affect the flow of certain types of materials, of course, that pass through them. Many of them are used in electro-hydraulic systems to support the amount of gas or liquid that a moderate specific device. It also serves to slow down or speed up the flow if necessary.

There may be cases where parts - as little or large they may be - are necessary for the mechanism works as it should to. For this reason, we must know where we buy them at any time, and if, in case of emergency. I think I found the greatest place to go for this purchase is the Internet.

There are not many stores in your area that you are in a position where they are able to sell them. This is mainly because they are not a standard household item ever to be used for everything. Even if a store does not sell, I can not say if they were purchased and not increased.

The best thing you can do is go online and use a search engine to a website that will find their happiness sold at a reasonable price. It is best to go with a company that is best for the production of these components and the like is known. This should not be difficult to find and you might have more business, then you may want to select.

If you try to servo valves you need to have all the necessary information at hand discovered. You should know what it is used, which device may need it Science article and how it is. Otherwise, you can do with a part you do not help at all will be glued.
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